When Do I Need a New AC Unit?

Even an air conditioner from a reputable brand, that’s been well-maintained, will eventually need to be replaced. But it’s not always obvious when you need a new AC unit. You might weigh the decision whether to invest in another repair, or continue using an older, less efficient system. To make life easier, these are some common signs your air conditioner needs to be replaced. 

Your AC Is Advanced in Age

Most air conditioners can last 15 years or longer if they’re properly maintained. The older your unit gets, the less efficient it becomes, and the more expensive it will be to repair. That’s because the warranty has expired and the fact older parts are becoming harder to find. If an aging system needs a big repair, it’s often more cost-effective to replace your air conditioner with a new AC unit (especially if it costs more than $5,000 to fix).

Multiple Repairs Are Needed Over a Short Time

If you’ve needed AC repair several times in recent months, chances are another repair job is coming up. A history of unforeseen problems provides a glimpse into the future. Additional potential repairs and expenses must be anticipated in deciding whether it’s time to replace the system. A replacement will prevent further breakdowns and inconveniences.

The System Isn’t Working as It Should

Once you turn on your AC, cool air should start blowing within minutes. If warm air is blowing from the vents even though you set the thermostat to a cool temperature, there may be a serious problem. A duct clog or dirty filter is possible, but when these issues aren’t the cause, technicians will look deeper into major equipment components. Temperature fluctuations and uneven temperatures are other signs of major trouble.

Energy Bills Are More Expensive

Don’t always assume rising energy costs are the reason you’re paying higher utility bills. Your AC may be becoming less efficient. A unit’s Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) typically declines with age. This is significant because heating and cooling accounts for about half of your energy bill. A new AC unit can save in terms of energy costs, fewer repairs, and a longer lifespan.

Moisture and Humidity Are Building Up

An air conditioner is designed to remove humidity from indoor air. An issue with the evaporator coil can interfere with this, as it extracts warm air, cools it, and redirects it back inside, all the while removing moisture. This is why some moisture normally drips outside. If the evaporator coil is no longer able to extract humidity, your home may feel clammy and moisture might accumulate on windows, around vents, or in ductwork, leading to discomfort and mold issues.

The AC Is Really Loud

If your AC is squealing, squeaking, rattling, or grinding, it’s an indication of mechanical wear or that something has already broken. Air conditioners rely on many moving parts to function properly. If one goes bad, then it will strain others. Loud noise often indicates there are multiple issues in the system.

Foul Odors Are Coming from the Vents

The air coming from the vents should be odor-free. If it smells musty, moldy, or smoky, ductwork and/or vital components may be contaminated. It is hard to reach inside condensers, compressors, and evaporators as well as tight, remote parts of your ventilation system and ensure the problem is completely resolved. Any residual mold, for example, will continue to grow even after an extensive cleaning. 

Contact One Source to Install a New AC Unit

If your AC is old, in need of major repairs, or not producing cold air, it’s time to consider replacement, which you can trust One Source Home Service for. We are AC replacement and installation professionals in Colorado Springs and Pueblo. Our goal is to ensure your home is comfortable, efficient, and has fresh air. To request emergency service, learn about options to save, or schedule a consultation for a new AC unit, call 719-532-9000There are many signs you may need a new AC unit. If any of the issues we mention apply, contact One Source Home Services about AC replacement. today.

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